AUTOMOTIVE WHITE PAPERS, APPLICATION NOTES, AND CASE STUDIES

  • Over the last decade, unmanned aerial vehicles and systems (UAVs/UASes)—also referred to as drones—have become widely popular and gained significant interest in commercial, consumer, and government markets. As these technologies are evaluated, radar performance, and versatility should be among key criterions, factoring more than just the cost of the hardware.

  • Radar sensors do have a direct influence on the automobile’s steering and control system and therefore need to be comprehensively tested in production. Rohde&Schwarz supplies reliable equipment with a small footprint to help you manage the challenges of automotive radar production lines.

  • Radome testing is a necessity, checking sensor components for radar compatibility. Previously, there were two methods used for testing. R&S introduces the R&S®QAR as another solution. 

  • In this white paper, automotive use cases and scenarios are discussed along with technology aspects, specifically for automotive applications. Important test and measurement needs are required to ensure optimal performance of these technologies. 

  • Gallium nitride (GaN) is widely viewed as a transformative technology which has enabled smaller, lighter, and more reliable RF/microwave devices than its predecessors. However, there are trade-offs to consider when selecting which technology to use for a particular application. 

AUTOMOTIVE NEWS FEATURES

AUTOMOTIVE EDITORIAL & GUEST COLUMNS

  • IMS 2018’s 5G Summit Examines Wireless Networks, Spectrum Policy, Autonomous Driving

    Much like the 2017 event, this month’s IEEE International Microwave Symposium 2018 (IMS) was abuzz with talk of 5G applications, rollouts, and developments. But nowhere was that focus more singular than Monday’s (June 12) 5G summit, whose speaker lineup looked like a connectivity all-star roster.

  • Loose Lips Sink Gifts And Spaceships

    Whether it’s a matter of national security or commercial success, a space plane or a sensor, brilliant people regularly refrain from trumpeting their astounding scientific achievements. It's not always easy or popular, but it's necessary, and I tip my hat top you, secret-keepers.