RF Military Electronics Featured Articles

  1. A 13-kW S-Band GaN Power Amplifier Design For Radar Applications
    5/2/2013

    The introduction of GaN as a solid state semiconductor material has enabled the manufacture of high-power, efficient amplifiers in a small volume. In 2011, CPI developed a 1300-watt S-band solid state power amplifier, CPI model VSS3607. This paper will present details of the design and performance data for the VSS3607 amplifier, including results from a 1000-hour life test. 

  2. White Paper: Airstrip™ — An Innovative Transmission Line Technology In Support Of Hi-Rel Space Qualified Packaging
    9/28/2011
    Mechanical integration of microwave components is often left as the last step while addressing manufacturing considerations for system-level designs. In many cases, the electrical design is analyzed, bread boards are built, electrical designs verified, and then it is left to the mechanical engineers to fit the various components into the final package. This paper shows how component manufacturers can help solve system-level packaging problems using Airstrip technology.
  3. White Paper: Passive RF And Microwave Beamformer Networks
    3/30/2011

    Beamforming networks for antennas have evolved since the 1960's. Early designs were typically fixed-beam architectures, although newer configurations include complex adaptive beamforming networks. This brief presentation reviews the origins of the technology, and offers several example circuit topologies of passive microwave beamformers. By Ken Greenwood, TRM Microwave

  4. White Paper: Advanced Microwave Laminate Materials For The Improvement Of Efficiency And Reliability In Antennas And Feed Networks
    10/26/2010
    Demands for higher system efficiency and improved product reliability at higher powers and wider operating temperature ranges in mission-critical antennas and feed networks have placed heightened and unique requirements on board materials. To meet these challenges, advanced laminate materials need to possess high electrical phase stability, dielectric constant control, high thermal conductivity, and multilayer capability. This article discusses the importance of critical material properties and explores new material developments for these applications. By George Q. Kang, Helena Li Hai, John C. Frankosky, Michael T. Smith, Arlon Materials for Electronics, Inc.
  5. Advanced Microwave Laminate Materials For The Improvement Of Efficiency And Reliability In Antennas And Feed Networks
    10/26/2010
    Demands for higher system efficiency and improved product reliability at higher powers and wider operating temperature ranges in mission-critical antennas and feed networks have placed heightened and unique requirements on board materials. To meet these challenges, advanced laminate materials need to possess high electrical phase stability, dielectric constant control, high thermal conductivity, and multilayer capability. This article discusses the importance of critical material properties and explores new material developments for these applications. By George Q. Kang, Helena Li Hai, John C. Frankosky, Michael T. Smith, Arlon Materials for Electronics, Inc.
  6. 5 Mistakes To Avoid When Specifying Integrated Microwave Assemblies
    10/6/2010
    Thirty years ago, the original IMAs were known as MICs — microwave integrated circuits — that integrated several microwave components into a single housing. These products created multifunctional performance by combining individual circuits fabricated on alumina carriers in a precisely machined aluminum package. Today’s technology has greatly increased the complexity, density, and functionality of IMAs. The machined package has been replaced by multi-layer microwave circuit boards, and techniques have evolved for combining the surface-mount devices, MMICs (monolithic microwave integrated circuits), and alumina MIC substrates — all on a single surface. By Narda Microwave-East
  7. White Paper: 5 Mistakes To Avoid When Specifying Integrated Microwave Assemblies
    10/6/2010

    Thirty years ago, the original IMAs were known as MICs — microwave integrated circuits — that integrated several microwave components into a single housing. These products created multifunctional performance by combining individual circuits fabricated on alumina carriers in a precisely machined aluminum package.

  8. White Paper: Changing EW Environment Requires Even Higher RF Power
    9/20/2010
    By Joe Hajduk, CEO, dB Control The theme of AOC's 47th Annual International Symposium and Convention is "Electronic Warfare in a Changing Environment." One aspect of the EW environment that's changing rapidly is the increased sophistication and persistence of threat radars. Today's threat radar detection systems must rapidly discriminate between real targets and those created by digital RF memories.
  9. Changing EW Environment Requires Even Higher RF Power
    9/20/2010
    The theme of AOC’s 47th Annual International Symposium and Convention is "Electronic Warfare in a Changing Environment." One aspect of the EW environment that’s changing rapidly is the increased sophistication and persistence of threat radars. Today’s threat radar detection systems must rapidly discriminate between real targets and those created by digital RF memories (DRFMs). A DRFM captures signals, digitizes them, reconverts them to their analog origin, and then rebroadcasts them, usually after modifying the signal based on a library of known emitters. The rebroadcast signal can be altered to change the target’s radar cross-section, range, speed, angle of arrival, and direction. It can also create false targets behind the target (reactive jamming) and ahead of it (predictive jamming) to trick radar detection systems into mislocating or misidentifying the target. By Joe Hajduk, dB Control
  10. White Paper: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Microwave Transistor Technology For Radar Applications
    9/10/2010
    By Aethercomm This paper reviews the relative merits of Si, GaAs, SiC, and GaN materials and describes how the attributes of each impact the operation of microwave transistors for the generation of high RF output power, on the order of hundreds to thousands of watts, as necessary for radar systems. It is shown that the superior physical attributes of GaN lead to microwave transistors that are extremely well suited for high-power applications.